Google Chrome to Support DNS of HTTPS

After Firefox in early September, Google had also revealed plans to support DNS over HTTPS (DoH).

In traditional DNS, the traffic between DNS servers and client that is looking up an address is going over the wire in un-encrypted and un-authenticated form. This means that the client does not know if the DNS server he is talking to is actually the correct server and that the connection has not been hijacked and he is delivered spoofed entries.

There have been efforts before to secure DNS traffic, and the most advanced and seasoned approach here is DNSCrypt, which is also using the default port TCP 443 (HTTPS) for its traffic.
The DNSCrypt v 2 protocol specification exists since 2013, but the protocol goes back to around 2008. It’s well tested and secure, and I would have expected this to be the quasi-standard to be used in Web browsers. In fact, Yandex browser already used this.

DNSCrypt setting in Yandex browser
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