Running my own BOINC Server

BOINC is a open-source software provided by the University of Berkeley and is intended for people to contribute computing time of their computers to running calculations for scientific projects.
Examples of such projects are Einstein@Home, SETI@Home, or LHC@Home among many others.

BOINC client can be run standalone or in connection with Oracle’s VirtualBox. Some projects indeed require VirtualBox to run.

I have been running the BOINC client software for several years now on different platforms like Fedora, Ubuntu, FreeBSD and Windows 10 and contributed to a handful of science projects, but mostly to the LHC@Home.

BOINC also has a server part that let’s you host your own science projects. If you have a lot of computations to do, and need additional computing power, you might want to look at this solution.
BOINC server consists of several parts, such as Apache HTTP server and MySQL databaseserver. However, this is a bit tedious. So thankfully, volunteers provide Docker containers and VirtualBox VMs you can download and use. Details can be found here.

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Re-visiting my LHC@Home Configuration

I have been using BOINC software to participate in scientific computing projects for around four years and contributed to several projects such as Einstein@Home, SETI@Home, Asteroids@Home and my personal favourite LHC@Home.

Starting with getting LHC@Home projects directly from LHC@Home, I switched to a pool with Gridcoin. I am now switching back and let my boxes crunch exclusively for LHC@Home.

My Boinc four clients now use a local SQUID proxy especially configured for LHC@Home and CERNVM-FS. While the number of machines probably does not do much to cut down on network usage, it’s something I tried some years ago and had abonded it. Apparently, LHC@HOme is now recommending you run a local proxy if you have several crunchers in your network.

I am happy to oblige!